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Niños San Isidro 2007,

 
Ver estadísticas de esta página ....Noticias sobre mi en UNED 24 agosto-2007
D y D Multimedia
www.dydmultimedia.net
 

 

Serpiente Glykon

http://plato.alien.de/service-bildarchiv-muenchen-glyptothek.htm

   

 

 

http://www.rotherwasribbon.com/

 

DINEDOR SERPENT

 

 

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/hereford/worcs/6268900.stm

 

 

VIDEO AND AUDIO NEWS

The stones were laid in a snake-like formation


RELATED BBC LINKS

Rotherwas Ribbon gallery

 

 more info at  http://www.rotherwasribbon.com/

 


An aerial view of the 'Rotherwas Ribbon' - thought to be 4000 years old

  • Search the web for Rotherwas Ribbon with Google.
  • Search the web for Rotherwas Ribbon Ancient Trackway with Google.
  • Try a Google search for images of Rotherwas Ribbon
  • New: Google Scholar search for references to Rotherwas Ribbon
  • Other sites nearby: ( * = Image)
    OLD: Pop-up a map of these sites
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     610m SE Dinedor Camp* Hillfort (SO524364)
     3.1km N St Ethelbert's Well (Hereford) Holy Well or Sacred Spring (SO511399)
     3.6km S St Ann's Well (Aconbury)* Holy Well or Sacred Spring (SO51173338)
     4.1km SW Aconbury Hill Hillfort (SO504331)
     5.6km S Higgin's Well* Holy Well or Sacred Spring (SO51163141)
     8.3km SE Capler Camp Hillfort (SO593329)
     8.4km NW Holy Well (Garway)* Holy Well or Sacred Spring (SO45554224)
     9.1km NE St Edith's Well (Herefordshire)* Holy Well or Sacred Spring (SO604406)
     9.5km N Sutton Walls Hillfort (SO525464)
     9.6km NW Holy Well (Swainshill) Holy Well or Sacred Spring (SO43724177)
     10.2km N St Ethelbert's Well (Marden) Holy Well or Sacred Spring (SO512471)
     10.3km NW Credenhill Camp Hillfort (SO451445)
     18.2km N Ivington Camp Hillfort (SO484547)
     18.5km S Llangattock Round Barrow(s) (SO461194)
     18.6km E Bosbury Church Stone* Standing Stone (Menhir) (SO695434)
     19.1km S The Queen Stone* Standing Stone (Menhir) (SO563183)
     19.8km W Pentre House Standing Stone Standing Stone (Menhir) (SO33154307)
     20.3km W Great Llanavon Farm Chambered Tomb (SO323417)
     20.6km SW Grosmont Fawr Hillfort (SO389210)
     20.9km W Chapel field Hillfort (SO32404425)
     

    http://www.noticioso.es/news/122/ARTICLE/1380/2007-07-12.html

     

    Ohio Serpent

    www.andrewcollins.com/page/articles/USVisit04.htm


    Great Serpent Mound, Southern Ohio, near Portsmouth

    Warren County, Ohio, serpent effigy

    - [ Traduzca esta página ]
    "The newly discovered serpent mound is in Warren County, Ohio, and hence may be called the Warren County Serpent Mound, as the other is called the Adams ...
    www.herper.com/Warrenmound.html - 13k - En caché - Páginas similares - Anotar esto

    OHS - Places - Serpent Mound

    - [ Traduzca esta página ]
    One of the few effigy mounds in Ohio, it is the largest in the United States, nearly a quarter of a mile long.
    www.ohiohistory.org/places/serpent/ - 28k - En caché - Páginas similares - Anotar esto

    Serpent Mound - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    - [ Traduzca esta página ]
    In 1967, the Ohio Historical Society opened the Serpent Mound Museum, ... Ohio's Serpent Mound -- segment of interview with Ross Hamilton, author of "The ...
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpent_Mound - 48k - En caché - Páginas similares - Anotar esto

    FS Ancient Mysteries News: Ohio Serpent Mound Built On Unique ...

    - [ Traduzca esta página ]
    FS Ancient Mysteries News: Ohio Serpent Mound Built On Geological Feature.
    farshores.org/a04ohio.htm - 13k - En caché - Páginas similares - Anotar esto

     

     

    Monumento de la Edad de Bronce desata una disputa en Inglaterra

    12-07-2007
    El descubrimiento de un monumento de piedras de 4.000 años de antigüedad, olvidado durante generaciones bajo unas tierras de cultivo en la frontera de Inglaterra con Gales, ha desatado una importante disputa entre los residentes y el concejo local.
    Reuters


     

    La pieza en forma de serpiente, de la Edad de Bronce, hecha de piedras fracturadas por calor y llamada Rotherwas Ribbon o Dinedor Serpent, fue descubierta cuando los trabajadores comenzaron las excavaciones para un camino ya controvertido cerca de Hereford, 193 kilómetros al oeste de Londres.

    "Ya lo llamábamos el 'camino a ninguna parte', porque allí es exactamente adonde va, y luego se descubrió este magnífico monumento de unos 400 metros de largo ", dijo el residente Martin Wyness.

    "Es un hallazgo maravilloso para Herefordshire y el mundo. Enterrarlo bajo una carretera sería una gran pérdida de nuestra herencia", agregó, comparándolo en importancia con el sitio de Stonehenge, un poco más antiguo, y listado como Patrimonio Mundial.

    Los residentes dicen que el camino, que tiene la intención de rodear un predio industrial, es innecesario.

    Pero el concejo de Herefordshire argumenta que la carretera es necesaria para aliviar el tráfico y se ha ofrecido a cubrir el monumento para conservarlo para las generaciones futuras, pero luego continuar con la construcción de la ruta.

    Los manifestantes afirman que la estructura, que sigue los contornos de la colina Dinedor, podría tener hasta 1.000 metros de longitud y no sólo los 60 metros iniciales que los excavadores sacaron a la luz.

    El uso de piedras quemadas en rituales de la Edad de Bronce está bien establecido, pero los arqueólogos que han visitado el sitio dicen que este hallazgo es único en Europa porque en otros casos, las piedras fueron halladas en montones que no seguían un patrón distintivo

     

     

     

     

    The Rotherwas Ribbon site

    The site of the Rotherwas Ribbon, picture by Margaret and Alan Ward.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/herefordandworcester/content/panoramas/rotherwas_ribbon_03_360.shtml

     

     

     Rotherwas Ribbon submitted by alun

    A ribbon of fire-cracked stones carefully laid to form a surface and dating back to approx 2000BC has been uncovered during the construction of a
    road in Herefordshire. Archaeologists believe this major find may have no parallels in Europe, with the closest similar artefact being the 2,000-year-old serpent mounds of the Ohio river valley in America.

    Dated as being constructed during the Early Bronze Age (2,000BC), it runs broadly at right angles (north to south) to the new Rotherwas access road, being constructed by Alfred McAlpine to the south of Hereford City and which prompted the archaeological dig which uncovered the find.

    The “Rotherwas Ribbon” comprises a series of linked opposing curves created by laid surfaces of deliberately fire-cracked stones (stones which have shattered after being heated by fire then dropped into water) unearthed from a ridge half a kilometre away.

    The ribbon-shaped feature is not flat, but is three dimensional as it appears to have been deliberately sculpted to undulate throughout the 60 metres of its length which have so far been uncovered.

    “While the practice of laying stones in small level ‘pavements’ close to standing stones is known from sites in Pembrokeshire and elsewhere, the closest parallel anywhere we can think of to the long sculpted form of this monument is the ‘Great Serpent Mound’ of the Hopewellian phase – 200BC to 400AD - of the Middle Woodland period in Ohio, USA,” said Herefordshire County Archaeologist Dr Keith Ray.

    “This is a very exciting find not just for Herefordshire, and not just for the UK, but, apparently so far unique in Europe - it has international significance,” he added.

    "We’re not sure what it was precisely built for – we can only speculate that it may have been used in some kind of ritual or ceremonial activity."

    To ensure the “Rotherwas Ribbon” remains intact for future generations to explore, detailed plans have been drawn up to encase the find and preserve it within a protective structure beneath the new road,.

    This work will begin early in July.

    Source:
    24dash

    Note: Ribbon campaigners stage sit-in. and campaigners arrested, see comments. Information on upcoming council meeting, see comments for link. See comment on flood damage fears.

    Rotherwas Ribbon submitted by alun
    View including a Roman ditch cut through the Ribbon. When the ditch was built in the Roman period it followed the path of the Ribbon. This may indicated that the Ribbon was waterlogged due to it being lower ground rather than it being visible in the Roman period.

    Rotherwas Ribbon submitted by alun
    Zoom view of the stones on a sandy soil bed. The stones look as though they could be easily dislodged, so it is unlikely the Ribbon is a road.

    Description 

    View including a Roman ditch cut through the Ribbon. When the ditch was built in the Roman period it followed the path of the Ribbon. This may indicated that the Ribbon was waterlogged due to it being lower ground rather than it being visible in the Roman period.

    On The Psychology Of Bombers, And Swarm Theory

    Four Stone Hearth XVIII is up at Clioaudio

    Wednesday, July 4th, 2007...1:50 am

    Rotherwas Ribbon - A Bronze Age Site ‘Unique In Europe’

    Jump to Comments

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    Although details are as yet relatively sketchy, the BBC are carrying this story on their Radio 4 news of a structure dating back 4,000 years, that has been uncovered at Rotherwas in Herefordshire, which is described as being unique in Europe…

    The ‘Rotherwas Ribbon’ is a snake-shaped area of fire-cracked stones which date back to the same period of Stonehenge - that’s the early Bronze Age, about 2,000 BC.

    Archaeologists believe this major find may have no parallels in Europe, with the closest similar artefact being the 2,000-year-old serpent mounds of the Ohio river valley in America.

    It’s been deliberately laid and runs at the base of Dinedor Hill - north to south at a right angle across the planned route for the new Rotherwas Access Road.

    The archaelogists have been working very closely with McAlpine who are building the road for the council and detailed plans have been drawn up to encase the find and preserve it within a protective structure beneath the new road.

    The team of archaelogists think it’s been built in a series of opposing curves using stones which were taken from a ridge half a mile away and shattered by being heated by fire and then dropped into water.

    To the naked eye it looks like a giant mosaic, similar to a cobbled street and archaelogists think that it may have been used in some kind of ritual or ceremonial activity.

    Dr Keith Ray… says it’s a very exciting find not just for Herefordshire, and not just for the UK, but, apparently so far unique in Europe - it has international significance.

    From what I can gather, the structure is set onto the side of a steep hill, and a series of burnt timber posts have also been discovered, whilst nearby have been found the traces of timber framed round-houses, indicating the area was settled and significant long before the Romans arrived there.

    Although it’s interesting to hear it compared to the Serpent Mound in Ohio, there is a considerable gap in time between the two sites, as the Serpent Mound is currently thought to have been constructed as recently as 1070 AD, after the radiocarbon dating of material found inside the mound; but there was one striking similarity, as evidenced by the burnt stones described below…

    Other studies indicate that features of Serpent Mound are aligned with both the summer solstice sunset and, less clearly, the winter solstice sunrise. A pile of burned stones once located inside the oval head area was several feet northwest of its center, possibly to make a more precise alignment with the point of the “V” in the serpent’s “neck” and the summer solstice sunset. The A.D. 1070 date coincides roughly with two extraordinary astronomical events. Light from the supernova that produced the Crab Nebula first reached Earth in 1054 and remained visible, even during the day, for two weeks. The brightest appearance ever of Halley’s Comet was recorded by Chinese astronomers in 1066. Could Serpent Mound have been a Native American response to such celestial events? “It is impossible to test whether or not the effigy mound represents a fiery serpent slithering across the sky,” says Lepper, “but it is fun to speculate.”

    I’m not sure if there’s a direct link between the heated and broken stones from Rotherwas, and the burnt stones of the Serpent Mound, especially given the 3,000-year gap and physical distance between the two sites, but snakes or serpents in religions of these approximate eras do seem to have been present at different locations separated by large geographical distances, as this report on pre-Islamic Persian Gulf religion indicates.

    Further archaeological work around the Rotherwas site looks set to continue, and hopefully there will be a proper story with more detail written up in the near future, as well as more images to add some clarification to the lay-out and overall design. (TJ)

    Update 11/07/07 - I received an email today from English Heritage Chief Executive Simon Thurley, via Moira Thomson, who kindly responded to an email I sent as part of a petition run from Rob Hattersley’s ‘Save The Rotherwas Ribbon’ site (aka the Dinedor Serpent), and here’s the body of the message…

    Thank you for your email correspondence about the recent discoveries at Rotherwas. English Heritage has, indeed, been informed about the discovery and have been liaising closely with local authority colleagues. Arrangements were made to visit the site on the 9 July 2007 and consideration will be given to the best way of ensuring preservation in situ of the remains. Our Heritage Protection Department is also considering whether the site meets the criteria for designation under the 1979 Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act.

    Although of course nothing has yet been decided, the signs are in my opinion, encouraging, although there does seem to be objection, unsurprisingly, from the people who want to build the road - commercial interests often clash with archaeology, but if the government rejected a funding application in response to Hereford Council, it would appear that the commercial benefits of building the access road would be less than spectacular. More comment will appear in a later post on this site.

    Here also is an earlier Press Release from EH, written before their most recent, July 9th visit to Rotherwas/Dinedor…

    This certainly appears to be a very exciting discovery from the Bronze Age, which includes a deliberately laid fire-cracked stone surface and posts. Each part of the find is very fragile and it would be difficult to move it. Also, by keeping the remains in their context, they can help us understand how people used to live in that landscape setting. Therefore we agree with the local authority that the best way to preserve the remains is to keep them in situ.

    English Heritage inspectors will visit the site again on Monday (July 9th) and will liaise with the local authority to assess how best to fully define and date the site. This process will include a consideration of the importance of the site and whether or not it should be scheduled. We are satisfied with the way the local authority has handled the discovery and we will continue to work with it, making sure that all aspects of the find will be fully recorded and that it has access to our expertise in this process.

    July 5th 2007

    see also: BBC News: (includes short video) Workers Discover Ancient ‘Snake’

    ·         Yes, there was a visit this afternoon which was fascinating - I posted a short report on www.rotherwasribbon.com

    Last Updated: Wednesday, 4 July 2007, 10:04 GMT 11:04 UK

    E-mail this to a friend

    Printable version

     

     

    Workers discover ancient 'snake'

    An aerial view of the 4000 year old 'Rotherwas Ribbon'

    Enlarge Image
     

    Diggers constructing a new access road have uncovered a mysterious serpent-shaped feature, dating from the early bronze age.

    The 197ft (60m) long ribbon of stones, found in Rotherwas, near Hereford, is thought to date from the same period as Stonehenge, roughly 2000 BC.

    County archaeologist Dr Keith Ray said as far as he is aware the stone feature is unique in Europe.

    "We can only speculate it may have been used in some kind of ritual," he said.

    'International significance'

    The Rotherwas Ribbon, as it is being called, is made up of a series of deliberately fire-cracked stones and appears to have been deliberately sculptured to undulate through the whole of its length that has so far been uncovered.

    "This is an exciting find, not just for Herefordshire and the UK, but apparently, so far, unique in Europe. It has international significance," Dr Ray said.

    Archaeologists said although the practice of laying stones in small level pavements is known at sites in Pembrokeshire and elsewhere, the closest parallel to the Rotherwas Ribbon is the "Great Serpent Mound", in Ohio, USA, which is thought to have been built between 200 BC and 400 AD.

    The Serpent Mound is a 1,330ft (405m) long effigy of a serpent.

     

     

     

     http://www.bbc.co.uk/herefordandworcester/content/panoramas/rotherwas_ribbon_03_360.shtml :Vista panorámica del lugar

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/herefordandworcester/content/image_galleries/rotherwas_ribbon_gallery.shtml?1:Fotos del sitio

    See also: BBC News: (includes short video) Workers Discover Ancient ‘Snake’

    Megalithic Portal - “Rotherwas Ribbon, Ancient Trackway In Herefordshire

    Wednesday, July 4th, 2007...1:50 am

    Rotherwas Ribbon - A Bronze Age Site ‘Unique In Europe’

    Jump to Comments

     

    Although details are as yet relatively sketchy, the BBC are carrying this story on their Radio 4 news of a structure dating back 4,000 years, that has been uncovered at Rotherwas in Herefordshire, which is described as being unique in Europe…

    The ‘Rotherwas Ribbon’ is a snake-shaped area of fire-cracked stones which date back to the same period of Stonehenge - that’s the early Bronze Age, about 2,000 BC.

    Archaeologists believe this major find may have no parallels in Europe, with the closest similar artefact being the 2,000-year-old serpent mounds of the Ohio river valley in America.

    It’s been deliberately laid and runs at the base of Dinedor Hill - north to south at a right angle across the planned route for the new Rotherwas Access Road.

    The archaelogists have been working very closely with McAlpine who are building the road for the council and detailed plans have been drawn up to encase the find and preserve it within a protective structure beneath the new road.

    The team of archaelogists think it’s been built in a series of opposing curves using stones which were taken from a ridge half a mile away and shattered by being heated by fire and then dropped into water.

    To the naked eye it looks like a giant mosaic, similar to a cobbled street and archaelogists think that it may have been used in some kind of ritual or ceremonial activity.

    Dr Keith Ray… says it’s a very exciting find not just for Herefordshire, and not just for the UK, but, apparently so far unique in Europe - it has international significance.

    From what I can gather, the structure is set onto the side of a steep hill, and a series of burnt timber posts have also been discovered, whilst nearby have been found the traces of timber framed round-houses, indicating the area was settled and significant long before the Romans arrived there.

    Although it’s interesting to hear it compared to the Serpent Mound in Ohio, there is a considerable gap in time between the two sites, as the Serpent Mound is currently thought to have been constructed as recently as 1070 AD, after the radiocarbon dating of material found inside the mound; but there was one striking similarity, as evidenced by the burnt stones described below…

    Other studies indicate that features of Serpent Mound are aligned with both the summer solstice sunset and, less clearly, the winter solstice sunrise. A pile of burned stones once located inside the oval head area was several feet northwest of its center, possibly to make a more precise alignment with the point of the “V” in the serpent’s “neck” and the summer solstice sunset. The A.D. 1070 date coincides roughly with two extraordinary astronomical events. Light from the supernova that produced the Crab Nebula first reached Earth in 1054 and remained visible, even during the day, for two weeks. The brightest appearance ever of Halley’s Comet was recorded by Chinese astronomers in 1066. Could Serpent Mound have been a Native American response to such celestial events? “It is impossible to test whether or not the effigy mound represents a fiery serpent slithering across the sky,” says Lepper, “but it is fun to speculate.”

    I’m not sure if there’s a direct link between the heated and broken stones from Rotherwas, and the burnt stones of the Serpent Mound, especially given the 3,000-year gap and physical distance between the two sites, but snakes or serpents in religions of these approximate eras do seem to have been present at different locations separated by large geographical distances, as this report on pre-Islamic Persian Gulf religion indicates.

    Further archaeological work around the Rotherwas site looks set to continue, and hopefully there will be a proper story with more detail written up in the near future, as well as more images to add some clarification to the lay-out and overall design. (TJ)

    Update 11/07/07 - I received an email today from English Heritage Chief Executive Simon Thurley, via Moira Thomson, who kindly responded to an email I sent as part of a petition run from Rob Hattersley’s ‘Save The Rotherwas Ribbon’ site (aka the Dinedor Serpent), and here’s the body of the message…

    Thank you for your email correspondence about the recent discoveries at Rotherwas. English Heritage has, indeed, been informed about the discovery and have been liaising closely with local authority colleagues. Arrangements were made to visit the site on the 9 July 2007 and consideration will be given to the best way of ensuring preservation in situ of the remains. Our Heritage Protection Department is also considering whether the site meets the criteria for designation under the 1979 Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act.

    Although of course nothing has yet been decided, the signs are in my opinion, encouraging, although there does seem to be objection, unsurprisingly, from the people who want to build the road - commercial interests often clash with archaeology, but if the government rejected a funding application in response to Hereford Council, it would appear that the commercial benefits of building the access road would be less than spectacular. More comment will appear in a later post on this site.

    Here also is an earlier Press Release from EH, written before their most recent, July 9th visit to Rotherwas/Dinedor…

    This certainly appears to be a very exciting discovery from the Bronze Age, which includes a deliberately laid fire-cracked stone surface and posts. Each part of the find is very fragile and it would be difficult to move it. Also, by keeping the remains in their context, they can help us understand how people used to live in that landscape setting. Therefore we agree with the local authority that the best way to preserve the remains is to keep them in situ.

    English Heritage inspectors will visit the site again on Monday (July 9th) and will liaise with the local authority to assess how best to fully define and date the site. This process will include a consideration of the importance of the site and whether or not it should be scheduled. We are satisfied with the way the local authority has handled the discovery and we will continue to work with it, making sure that all aspects of the find will be fully recorded and that it has access to our expertise in this process.

    July 5th 2007

    see also: BBC News: (includes short video) Workers Discover Ancient ‘Snake’

    Megalithic Portal - “Rotherwas Ribbon, Ancient Trackway In Herefordshire


     

    17 Comments

    • I live about 2 miles from where the relief road is being built and am very interested in historical finds in my area. Hereford council is renowned (locally) for pulling down ancient buildings in favour of new ones and disregarding important finds to build a road on. If this is such a ‘unique’ find, why are they still going to build a road over a portion of it?
    • Yes, interesting site. I was there a few weeks ago. I am a geologist and while looking at some exposures on the new road was asked to look at this one to establish where the materials had come from. The source is described as Wye Terrace Number4 but actually they are cryoturbated glacial deposits. I am not expert at this geology so can’t say much more. All I could do was confirm the origin of the materials used in the site.
    • A first in Europe? One needs a look at my gggrandfather’s book “Worship of the Serpent traced throughout the world….” by John Bathurst Deane (1830). He spends some time explaining how Avebury’s avenues are landscape serpents. .. It’s hard reading but his hypothesis is that: Serpent story in Eden represents fall of man, serpent worship appears throughout the world, therefore all humanity started in Eden. Nutty!
    • Visit the campaign website and support us in a number of ways in stopping the concreting over of Hereford’s Stonehenge…
    • Thanks for the link Rob, I’ll check that out more fully in a moment - it makes me wonder exactly where English Heritage stand on such matters, and why we haven’t heard of any interventions instigated by them - hopefully they’re on the case by now.

      And thanks too Ross, for the additional info on the book - snake religion seems to have pervaded much of the ancient world at various stages - the earliest site that is suggestive of such practice is Rhino Cave in Botswana at 70,000 bp, and I hope to post something on that in due course.

      Tim

    • oops, I didn’t initially see the comment from Alex and RG.

      Re the local council having a cavalier attitude to relics from the past, I find it hard to believe that any Council in its right mind wouldn’t immediately step into protect such a site. I’m not sure whether they’re intending to just cover up the part of the structure that is in the path of the proposed road, and protecting the rest, or just leaving it to fend for itself, so to speak - I need to read up on this some more - also, Rob’s comment contains a good link to the shenanigans surrounding this.

      rg - not sure if you know, but if you live locally, I think there is an opportunity for the public to visit the site on Saturday afternoon - please see link to BBC report in this post for details.

      Tim

    • […] Ribbon - A Road Runs Through It Jump to Comments It seems that despite the discovery of what has been described as a 4,000 year-old Bronze Age site which is unique in Europe, the local […]
    • As a historian, I am amazed and very excited by this discovery, whgich obviously is extremely significant. All possible steps MUST be taken to preserve this so that it can be seen, and not be hidden away. The road should be diverted or built elsewhere, so that further archaeological work can continue. This is hugely important.

      My husband, the Rev’d David Staple, OBE is in complete agreeement - we hope to be able to visit the site and see the finds when we next visit the area in August.

      Margaret Staple

    • Yes, there was a visit this afternoon which was fascinating - I posted a short report on www.rotherwasribbon.com
    • The gravels may be 100,000 years old, 4 Ice Ages back, and are not the gravels described as Wye Terrace 4. They are glacial and not water deposits so that the book will have to be re- written in terms of local Quaternary geology. Of course this will give us an indication of the climatic conditions of early Herefordshire and an idea of what it was like for any humans here at the time. Pity I missed the meeting there as it would have been great to have shown the solid geology as well, with the faulting and displacement of the hard sandstones and mudstones, which will in the course of time become vegetated and invisible.
    • An e-petition has been set up on the Number 10 Downing Street website (open to UK citizens)…

      Save the Rotherwas Ribbon

      A recently discovered 4000 year old monument in rural Herefordshire is soon to be covered by a new road development. Archaeologists believe this major find on the outskirts of Hereford is unique in the world, as important as Stonehenge.

      Development of the Rotherwas Access Road must stop immediately. A full public inquiry should be held to decide the future of the Rotherwas Ribbon.

      The Rotherwas Ribbon is a snake-like monument built in three dimensions out of blocks of stone. The stones were heated by fire and plunged into water to crack them into blocks, which have been sculpted to undulate along the 60 metre length of the monument.

      Plans have been drawn up by Herefordshire Council and road developers to encase the find beneath the new road, which will run at right angles to the monument.

      Sign this petition to send a message to Herefordshire Council and the Government that the Rotherwas Ribbon must be saved for the nation.

      http://petitions.pm.gov.uk/rotherwas/

    • Rob - thanks for the petition link, which I would encourage as many people to sign up to as possible - I think English Heritage were due to visit and assess the site on Monday 9th, as soon as more news is available, I’ll post it - thanks also to everyone else for their comments, and hopefully enough awareness will give this Rotherwas Ribbon the recognition and protection it surely warrants. Tim
    • Margaret, sorry I couldn’t access your comment to reply directly, as I only see the most recent on the front page - anyway, hopefully you and your husband, as well as many more of us, will be glad that English Heritage appear to be onboard, regarding the preservation of the Ribbon.
    • “English Heritage appear to be onboard”

      Really? Impression I got from the early reports was they had been complicit in trying to quickly cover it with the road.

      Beware the council and the local MP, they have been after the road for many years and I doubt some unique archeology will stop their efforts.

      EH will probably wait to see which way the wind blows from above before making their politically safe decision.

    • The whole area from the hill fort on Dinedor hill and the trackways and hedges and right down to the bottom should be scheduled preserving the whole landscape. This is a very special site, unique in Europe We need you to help to ensure this does happen.
    • Thanks James, I’ll look round and see what gives regarding the rest of the local landscape you mention.
    • doubtingthomas - thanks for your comment - I’m not sure for how long EH have been involved in this - the impression I got was that they only became aware of Dinedor Serpent once construction had started - I know EH have come in for past criticism at other sites, but I’d be very surprised if they didn’t get the site designated as an ancient monument - and from what James Hamer says, maybe there’s a need to look at the wider context of the site as well.

    Bronze Age serpent sparks UK road row | NEWS.com.au

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    The snake-shaped Bronze Age feature made of fire-cracked stones and dubbed the Rotherwas Ribbon or Dinedor Serpent was discovered as workers began ...
    www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,22060502-38200,00.html - Páginas similares - Anotar esto

    Talking 'bout a revolution :: View topic - SAVE THE DINEDOR ...

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    Post Posted: Mon Jul 16, 2007 3:09 pm Post subject: SAVE THE DINEDOR SERPENT (or Rotherwas Ribbon), Reply with quote ...
    students.bugs.bham.ac.uk/peopleandplanet/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?p=1286&sid=e7f326fbe063325ee68b07bd6d219e3f - 25k - En caché - Páginas similares - Anotar esto

    BBC - Hereford and Worcester - About Herefordshire - Rotherwas ...

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    Stonehenge is diminished by its close proximity to a modern road and our Dinedor Serpent would be likewise spoiled if the building of the relief road ...
    www.bbc.co.uk/herefordandworcester/content/image_galleries/rotherwas_ribbon_gallery.shtml?3 - 151k - En caché - Páginas similares - Anotar esto

    UK road building protests and camps 2007

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    Rotherwas Ribbon / Dinedor Serpent - newsletter 5 (Bob Clay - 3 Aug) July 2007 Rotherwas Ribbon / Dinedor Serpent - newsletter 4 (Bob Clay - 29 Jul) ...
    www.wussu.com/roads/ - 25k - En caché - Páginas similares - Anotar esto