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                                                                  ANFITEATRO DE EL DJEM  

icon.stoa.org/gallery/ album12/Dougga_theatre_...:Más fotos e información de Tunicia( Thuburbo Maius, El Djem, etc..)

 

http://lexicorient.com/tunisia/index.htm

 


 
 
 

El Jem, Tunisia

The colosseum was constructed between 230 and 238 CE by the command of the Imperial official Gordian. It's believed to have given room for as much as 30,000 spectators, some estimates set it at 45,000. This in the town of Thysdrus with only 30,000 inhabitants. But was a wealthy town, probably eager to impress its visitors.
The building process is even more impressive considering that the stones were quarried 30 km away at Salakta. In 238 Gordian committed suicide after an unsuccessful rebellion against Rome, where he had claimed to be emperor. With this, the construction of the amphitheatre ended. It was never completely finished, but was of course used.
Around El Jem there are more to be found, not by today's tourists, but by the archaeologists of the future. Another, but smaller amphitheatre, can be seen around a kilometre away. And aerial photos indicate another and bigger one close to El Jem.
 

El Jem, Tunisia

 

El Jem, Tunisia

 

The arena is 65 metres long and 39 metres wide, large enough to host more than one show at a time. Note inside the amphitheatre that the decorations are rather crude. This was because the stone used was too soft for fine sculpture.
The upper part of the tiers were used as a sort of VIP tribune, where roofed rooms allowed hiding from the hot sun.

El Jem, Tunisia


 

El Jem, Tunisia
 


 

 

 
El Jem, Tunisia
 


 

                                                         Dungeons


 

El Jem, Tunisia
 

 
El Jem, Tunisia
 

Underneath the arena run two passageways. This was the place where animals, prisoners and gladiators were kept, just until the moment when they were brought up into the bright daylight to perform what was in most cases the last show of their lives.

 

El Jem, Tunisia
 


 
El Jem, Tunisia